Are you interested in the hop exchange?

Yes, I will have rhizomes to send and will want some in return.
7
23%
Yes, I will have rhizomes to send but don't want any in return
1
3%
Yes, but I don't have anything to send, I only want to establish a garden
12
40%
No, I'm not interested
0
No votes
No, but I'll send someone my pants
10
33%
 
Total votes : 30

Sun May 18, 2008 1:52 pm

This sounds like a fantastic idea, but there are a few problems.

First of all, I doubt any of us planting hops this year will be able to generate a big enough rhizome by winter to divide it. I'm new to growing hops, but my experience with other plants leads me to beleive that it will take 3 or more years to be able to grow a large and healthy enough rhizome to divide up and ship out to friends. You have to remember that every time you split the rhizome it can weaken the plant, resulting in crummy yields or worse the next year.

Secondly, as soilboy mentioned, there are some areas that are quarantined for various argircultural reasons. I would strongly discourage anyone from violating these rules. Quarantines are put in place for a reason.

Other than that, I'd be interested in sharing/receiving hop rhizomes.
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Madtown Brew
 
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Tue Jun 17, 2008 7:12 am

Madtown Brew wrote:This sounds like a fantastic idea, but there are a few problems.

First of all, I doubt any of us planting hops this year will be able to generate a big enough rhizome by winter to divide it. I'm new to growing hops, but my experience with other plants leads me to beleive that it will take 3 or more years to be able to grow a large and healthy enough rhizome to divide up and ship out to friends. You have to remember that every time you split the rhizome it can weaken the plant, resulting in crummy yields or worse the next year.

Secondly, as soilboy mentioned, there are some areas that are quarantined for various argircultural reasons. I would strongly discourage anyone from violating these rules. Quarantines are put in place for a reason.

Other than that, I'd be interested in sharing/receiving hop rhizomes.


from what i have been led to believe is that at the end of the growing season, you cut the bine 1 foot from the ground and then bury it in soil all winter. In the spring you dig up the 1 foot of buried bine and it is now a rhizome.

i have a hallertaur hops plant that is in its second year. I have 4 bines growing from one rhizome, all of which are over my head (more than 6 feet tall). I am willing to try to make rhizomes for others. I will be moving next year so no hop rhizomes for me (but i'll trade my plant for your beer!).
suck it
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boobookittyfuk
 
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Location: pittsburgh

Wed Jun 18, 2008 6:40 am

I would be interested in sharing currently I have second year

First Gold
Brambling
Hallertau
Tettnager

Would love Amarillo so if any one can jump the fence and get me one I would be your best friend for ever :wink:

Pity you cant get it for home growing as I live on Amarillo Ale
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awalker
 
Posts: 386
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Location: Essex, UK

Harvesting rhizomes for an exchange

Wed Jun 18, 2008 2:01 pm

boobookittyfuk wrote:
Madtown Brew wrote:snip ... First of all, I doubt any of us planting hops this year will be able to generate a big enough rhizome by winter to divide it. ... snip


from what i have been led to believe is that at the end of the growing season, you cut the bine 1 foot from the ground and then bury it in soil all winter. In the spring you dig up the 1 foot of buried bine and it is now a rhizome.
... snip

I have done quite a bit of reading about hops, and I have never come across your suggested method; it is similar to the last method I will mention below, but yours is different if I am understanding you correctly. I have found four methods of propogation discussed in other places.

1. Rhizomes: the vast concensus seems to be that harvesting rhizomes (root cuttings from the crown) and planting them is the best method; it is the method used commercially, so that probably speaks for itself.

2. Seeds have been used by some, but they are out of the question in my opinion; you can't eliminate male plants, which usually are unwanted, and the seed will be hybrids (cross-species) rather than the genetically identical 'clones' which results from rhizomes -- which is what you probably want.

3. Cuttings that are rooted with the use of root-growth hormones have been successful, but this does not seem poplular -- probably because other methods work perhaps as well but without the need to purchase hormones.

4. Rooting of bines in the soil. This technique is different from what has been suggested because the bines are NOT cut until they are rooted, the rooting does not occur in the winter as suggested, but rather during the growing season, and the whole cutting is not buried. I am not suggesting that the original method won't work, but I will explain why I would expect the method I am describing now to work better. Hops are similar to tomato plants in that the vines/bines are capable of rooting when they are buried in the soil; if you will pull a branch of a tomato plant down to the ground, cover it with a bit of soil and put a rock on it to keep it buried, it will quickly develop roots where it is buried. Hops will do the same. The method reported in numerous places is to select a bine and bury some portion of the middle of it; it then remains connected to the crown, where it can derived water and nutrients, until it establishes sufficient roots. AFTER it is rooted, the length of bine which connects it and the original crown is then cut so that the new rooted bine now has an already established bine with leaves. This is done DURING the growing season so that it can continue to grow, enlarging its root system and storing the energy that it needs to make it through the winter. Now, some growers will do this after they harvest their cones, which shortens the time for developing roots, but there is a lot of vegetation to help provide energy for rooting along with the crown. Others prefer to select spare bines that they would end up trimming from their support anyway at the beginning of the season; in that way, the new plants have the entire season to develop a root system.

Personally, I have never done anything except plant and harvest rhizomes. In that respect, and in reply to 'Madtown Brew', let me post this experience. Last year was my first year to grow; I planted three varieties: Fuggles (did VERY well), Centennial (did poorly with very little cone production and bines probably less than 8'), and Magnum (did BADLY, with one rhizomes dying and the other growing to not much more than perhaps 3'). Despite the poor 'above-ground' growth of the latter, when I dug the crowns up to move them to a new location this past spring, I was surprised to find that the crowns of the two Centennial and one Magnum were nearly as large as the Fuggles (I cut the rootball for each of them down to about 1' x 3', rolled the balls into a wheelbarrow, spray-washed the soil off with a hose, and harvested rhizomes). After trimming some very nice-sized rhizomes to give away, I divided the crowns into 'super'-sized crowns by cutting them into three pieces each, and they are now growing well in their new locations. From my nine plants, I harvested 52 rhizomes which where shipped to our Grow-Hops free rhizome exchange (several hundred where given away). I live in Arkansas, by the way.

Grow-Hops(Yahoo) now has 2,174 members plus we have a .com presence where we are developing a Grow-Hops wiki, etc. For more info, please visit www.tinyurl.com/29zr8r

Cheers.

Bill Velek
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Re: Rhizome Exchange

Mon Jul 21, 2008 11:36 am

I am in!

I should be able to contribute some Cascade, Centennial, EKG, and Nugget.
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Mills
 
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Re: Rhizome Exchange

Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:56 am

I will try and split my glacier this next spring. I only have one plant, in year 3, so I am not sure how many rhizomes you can take off the plant. I have never done it before but I am willing to give it a shot and would be happy to send them off to another member of the brewing army.
HarnessStBrewer
 
Posts: 11
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Re: Rhizome Exchange

Thu Aug 07, 2008 7:04 am

I'm in, I've got 2 cascades and 2 brewers gold, both first year. The cascades are about 8+ feet at the tallest. The brewers gold, bought on accident (I thought I was ordering cascades, but fat fingered the order somewhere, so had to reorder the cascades). The brewers gold are growing great, and a couple of bines are about 18 feet tall with lots of side shoots. Interestenly, the bines that are the tallest have 2 bines per rope. All the others, including my cascades, have 1 bine per rope, and and are only about 8-10 feet.

Here are my brewers gold, I'm hoping that they shade the south facing window next summer.
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