Carbonation Levels Jockey Box

Thu Mar 13, 2014 4:14 am

Hi Guys,

I am about to start kegging and I have one major question. I am looking at force carbonating to ensure there is as little sediment as possible in the keg. There are plenty of posts online that cover carbonation levels at various temperatures and the advise seems to be that you should carbonate at lower temperatures. I am looking at doing a "Jockey box" setup. The benefit being that the keg doesn't have to be kept cool. My question is as follows; the keg temp will obviously be higher than it was when I carbonated the beer and will therefore have less dissolved CO2. Does anybody know the best way around this? Is it better to try and get carbonation levels right for the approximate temperature it will be kept at while serving? I don't know for certain, but I would guess that the drop in temp in the coil/plate will not get the carbonation level to what it should be. I suppose I could use a trial and error approach but I don't really want to waste all that beer. :oops:
capetownbrew.blogspot.com/
Primary: Red Lager
Secondary: Apple & Cranberry Wine, Strawberry Wine, Mead
Bottled: Coopers Real Ale, Coopers Mexican Cerveza, Coopers Ginger Beer (Alcoholic)
Next Up:​ Tequilla & Lime Cerveza, Tafel Lager Clone
capetownbrew
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:47 am
Location: Cape Town, South Africa

Re: Carbonation Levels Jockey Box

Thu Mar 13, 2014 6:09 pm

If you're carbonating cold, then use the pressure recommended for that temp on one of the carbonation tables. If you're going to keep it warm afterwards, adjust the pressure to keep the same level of CO2 at the new temp. You'll just need a longer serving line to reduce that pressure before it leaves the faucet. Maybe the length of coils in the jockey box already compensates for the added pressure needed. I haven't used one, so can't say, with authority.

Cheers
dogismycopilot
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Thu Sep 02, 2010 5:38 pm

Re: Carbonation Levels Jockey Box

Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:42 am

dogismycopilot wrote:If you're carbonating cold, then use the pressure recommended for that temp on one of the carbonation tables. If you're going to keep it warm afterwards, adjust the pressure to keep the same level of CO2 at the new temp. You'll just need a longer serving line to reduce that pressure before it leaves the faucet. Maybe the length of coils in the jockey box already compensates for the added pressure needed. I haven't used one, so can't say, with authority.

Cheers


Thanks for the response, I will try to carbonate at the temp it will be kept at. I thought that the length of the coil was probably enough to drop the pressure.
capetownbrew.blogspot.com/
Primary: Red Lager
Secondary: Apple & Cranberry Wine, Strawberry Wine, Mead
Bottled: Coopers Real Ale, Coopers Mexican Cerveza, Coopers Ginger Beer (Alcoholic)
Next Up:​ Tequilla & Lime Cerveza, Tafel Lager Clone
capetownbrew
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:47 am
Location: Cape Town, South Africa

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