Re: Bottling brett beers

Thu Jun 06, 2013 6:40 pm

brewinhard wrote:I think you are wise to add fresh yeast at bottling. It is a simple measure to ensure that proper carbonation will occur in a timely manner for a beer that you have already been waiting a long time for. Be sure to properly rehydrate the yeast before adding to your bottling bucket along with your priming sugar. It will be entering an acidic environment with no oxygen and a fair amount of alcohol. My favorite strain for this is Lalvin EC-1118. It is only $1 at my LHBS, is a champagne yeast which is highly alcohol tolerant AND tolerant to acidic environments (ie sour beer).


That's GREAT information about Lalvin EC-1118. I'll definitely be keeping that in mind. Is that yeast also good for lagers? Or would it continue to ferment?
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Re: Bottling brett beers

Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:51 pm

It is a great all around yeast to use for any type of sour or high gravity brewing to ensure timely carbonation. It does NOT continue to ferment in the bottle at all.
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Re: Bottling brett beers

Thu Jun 13, 2013 9:39 pm

My understanding is that wine yeast is LESS attenuative than beer yeasts, so the only reason you'd get wine yeast that keeps fermenting beyond what you account for with priming sugar would be if your initial ferment completely stalled leaving sugars they can eat behind.
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Re: Bottling brett beers

Fri Jun 14, 2013 5:23 am

spiderwrangler wrote:My understanding is that wine yeast is LESS attenuative than beer yeasts, so the only reason you'd get wine yeast that keeps fermenting beyond what you account for with priming sugar would be if your initial ferment completely stalled leaving sugars they can eat behind.


Depends on what you're fermenting. They definitely don't like the more complex sugars in wort. Beer yeast is also going to go after the simple sugars first so in theory there wouldn't be any sugars that the wine yeast would eat after the beer yeast got through with it. (Just elaborating)
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Re: Bottling brett beers

Mon Jun 17, 2013 7:55 am

Ozwald wrote:Depends on what you're fermenting.


Yes. I was speaking in terms of wort, with a whole slew of sugars of varying complexity.
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Re: Bottling brett beers

Mon Jun 17, 2013 9:36 am

spiderwrangler wrote:
Ozwald wrote:Depends on what you're fermenting.


Yes. I was speaking in terms of wort, with a whole slew of sugars of varying complexity.


That's why I agreed with you :wink:
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