CO2 Regulator Connections

Mon Dec 10, 2012 3:17 pm

Trying to get a commercial regulator salvaged and working for my Keezer. I have located a handful of the barbed line connections. Can anyone tell me if there is supposed to be a washer between the connection and the regulator nipple? I can't believe these go on "metal to metal".

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USN Smitty
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Tue Dec 11, 2012 7:09 am

The flared fittings for your co2 lines don't require gaskets. Do make sure you use some soapy water to check your connections for leaks.
The regulator to tank connection should have a plastic or fiber gasket or an o-ring to seal.
Good Luck! :jnj
Keep on Brewin'
Captain Carrot


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captain carrot
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Tue Dec 11, 2012 7:35 am

When using tube, it has been common practice, especially in the transportation or automotive world, to use a copper flare seat (interface) between the flare fitting and flared tube. You should be good with the fittings you show and no other seal.
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Kbar
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Wed Dec 12, 2012 6:19 am

I would suggest some teflon tape on the fitting, you could get by without, but it will help make a good tight seal.
CRBrewHound
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:48 pm

CRBrewHound wrote:I would suggest some teflon tape on the fitting, you could get by without, but it will help make a good tight seal.

The tape acts as lube to make it easier to tighten when the threads are making the seal. In this case no amount of overtightening will make a difference. They do make gas line tape but it is also jot appropriate for this.
Willys
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:49 am

Willys wrote:
CRBrewHound wrote:I would suggest some teflon tape on the fitting, you could get by without, but it will help make a good tight seal.

The tape acts as lube to make it easier to tighten when the threads are making the seal. In this case no amount of overtightening will make a difference. They do make gas line tape but it is also jot appropriate for this.


"Thread seal tape is a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film cut to specified widths for use in sealing pipe threads.

Thread seal tape can be used in many ways, the most common of which is to seal pipe threads. Also known as plumber's tape, PTFE tape, tape dope, or popularly but incorrectly as Teflon (A Dupont trade name) tape.

In use, the tape is wrapped around the exposed threads of a pipe before it is screwed into place. The tape is commonly used commercially in pressurized water systems, such as central heating systems, as well as in air compression equipment and thread joints with coarse threads. One of the defining characteristics of PTFE is how good it is at defeating friction. The use of PTFE tape in tapered pipe threads performs a lubricating function, which more easily allows the threads to be screwed together, to the point of deformation, which is what creates the seal."

Wikipedia
CRBrewHound
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:40 pm

CRBrewHound wrote:
Willys wrote:
CRBrewHound wrote:I would suggest some teflon tape on the fitting, you could get by without, but it will help make a good tight seal.

The tape acts as lube to make it easier to tighten when the threads are making the seal. In this case no amount of overtightening will make a difference. They do make gas line tape but it is also jot appropriate for this.


"Thread seal tape is a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film cut to specified widths for use in sealing pipe threads.

Thread seal tape can be used in many ways, the most common of which is to seal pipe threads. Also known as plumber's tape, PTFE tape, tape dope, or popularly but incorrectly as Teflon (A Dupont trade name) tape.

In use, the tape is wrapped around the exposed threads of a pipe before it is screwed into place. The tape is commonly used commercially in pressurized water systems, such as central heating systems, as well as in air compression equipment and thread joints with coarse threads. One of the defining characteristics of PTFE is how good it is at defeating friction. The use of PTFE tape in tapered pipe threads performs a lubricating function, which more easily allows the threads to be screwed together, to the point of deformation, which is what creates the seal."

Wikipedia



Exactly. Flaired fittings are not coarse like black iron and do not need to deform to create the seal. So again, lube is not needed and will only help screw up the threads.
Willys
 
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Re: CO2 Regulator Connections

Sat Dec 15, 2012 11:02 pm

Straight threads do not need thread sealant. Tapered threads do. Please, never use thread sealant on straight thread fittings.
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Kbar
 
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