Wed Apr 25, 2007 3:52 am

Good one GOOBER...
Bet you cant wait for next one...EASEY PEASEY..Ehh
Who is next.???????????
PJ
Who needs Kegs or Bottles...Straight from the Fermenter...IS THE GO..
poppa joe
 
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Fri Apr 27, 2007 1:10 pm

GooberMcNutly wrote:I was thinking something more like this:

Image

It has a good mechanical advantage and an easy 500 lb capacity. And I can find them under $10. . . .


Well hell, If I knew you could get your hands on that sort of gear for $10.00. Jeez... that'd cost at least $50.00 over here. I want one of those... no use for it, but I want one anyway.

Thirsty
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Thirsty Boy
 
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Location: Melbourne Australia

Sat Apr 28, 2007 3:31 pm

GooberMcNutly wrote:I was thinking something more like this:

It has a good mechanical advantage and an easy 500 lb capacity. And I can find them under $10. With the mechanical advantage, a quick half hitch will hold the grain in place.

I like the really tight weave on the fabric. While it would be nice to just pull the sack out of the pot, the wort was very, very clear in my hydrometer sample jar and I think that spending 10 minutes while it drips isn't a big thing, I am using that time to bring the wort up to a boil anyway.


Goober, you got a name for that material and where you got it? I need to cut my brew time from 5hrs down to around 2hrs, and extract is the only way I've seen to do it. The time savings alone make me very interested in this method.

Cheers!
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bergerandfries
 
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Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:21 pm

Bergerandfries,

It sounds like goobers bag is a pretty good one, but if you can find it, the material that most of the guys doing BIAB in australia are using is called "Swiss Voile" 100% polyester and it is predominantly used as a material for curtains/drapes. I think there is also a cotton fabric called swiss voile that is used for wedding dresses... no that one! Goober seems to have had a bit of trouble finding the same material though.

Goober's material seems to be a much tighter weave, and if you dont have the ability to set up a pulley system, it might be a bit hard to use.

The voil lets the wort through much more easily, and so you aren't having to lift up 20litres of wort as well as the grain. You can just pull it out fairly quickly and plop it in a colander on top of your kettle or hang it off a door knob over a bucket to drain out while your kettle comes to a boil.

But... goober says his material gave him "very clear" wort, and the voil isn't that good, its not bad, but I wouldn't say very clear.

Anyway, you'll have to wait for goober to tell you what he got before you can make a choice.

Thirsty
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Thirsty Boy
 
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Location: Melbourne Australia

Mon Apr 30, 2007 5:02 am

I did another BIAB brew tonight with a Russian Imperial Stout, shooting for a final gravity in the 1.087 range just to check the ability to do bigger beers.

Space was not a problem at all. I still had a "thin" mash with 10 gallons of water pre-grain, shooting for a 6 gallon batch. The bag I have is too thick. With the thicker wort it took forever and a day to drain and I know I left at least a gallon in the grains that just wasn't draining. I need to get some slightly thinner material. Silkscreening material might be just the ticket. Where would I buy that? Another person from the Phillipines wrote me and said he will try with "white poly seed bag" like grains come in. The 50 lb size is a tiny bit small, but it might work and no sewing involved. I am still going to try to find a more open bag material, especially for bigger, darker brews where efficiency is more important than wort clarity. With 25 lbs of grain in it, it just took too long to drain.

I didn't have any trouble making my gravity. In fact I was about 2 points low, but I had shortened my 90 minute boil by 15 minutes due to an empty propane tank.

Ill be putting my London Porter in the bottles in a few days, then tasting a week or so after that. Then the real proof will become evident.
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GooberMcNutly
 
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Location: Central Florida

Mon Apr 30, 2007 10:48 am

Goober, imagining a quicker runoff out of the bag, what kind of time does your session take?
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bergerandfries
 
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 11:35 am

bergerandfries wrote:Goober, imagining a quicker runoff out of the bag, what kind of time does your session take?


Here is about how my session runs:

30 minutes to get out my equipment, make sure it is all clean, assemble my water filter and start filling the pot. Ill put some heat on the pot once I have a few inches of water in it, aiming to control my water speed and my heat to get to my volume at about my temps. I run the water slowly through the filter because we have bad chlorine, so going slowly through the carbon is essential. A pencil thick stream take a while to fill 10 gallons.

90 minutes: Mash. This time I put the grain all in the bag dry, then stuffed the bag into the pot, tied the string to the spigot to keep it from falling in and attacked it with the mash paddle to break up dough balls. Much less dough balls than before. I had to heat a bit too because I lost about 5 degrees from the gain, not 2.

30 minutes: Mash out and "sparging". I light the fire and it takes a good 10 minutes just to go from 155 up to about 165. I don't want to heat too quickly right away. I give it a good stir and start pulling the bag once I see 163 or so. It took me more than 30 minutes to drain the bag, so this was closer to 45 minutes total sparging. But I am already heating the pot and by the time I was done draining the bag, the wort was about 200 degrees. Which makes for sweaty, steamy work when it was 90 degrees outside that day, heavy lifting over the pot.

90 minute boil. Ill do 1 hour boils sometimes, but I had the time and was going for higher gravity this time, so I made sure to push the boil right up to 90 minutes, but I ran out of gas 5 minutes from the end. Good timing!

30 minutes to cool down to about 92 degrees or so. I have 80 to 82 degree tap water, so cooling isn't the easiest for me. I then run the wort into the carboy, take it inside and put it in an icebath in the sink for another hour to get it down to the 73 to 75 degrees for yeast pitching.

30 minutes: Assorted cleanup, record keeping, notes taking, etc. I have to wash the keg, dump the grain on the garden, wash the bag, etc. The bag takes about 5 minutes to wash off, turn inside out, wash off again, turn it back the right way and hose again. It was black when I started and the hose made it white again. I was amazed that it wasn't stained at all.

Most of the "regular" brewing stuff is still going to take time, but I expected that. What saves me the most time is that I don't have to clean two more pieces of equipment (well, a HLT doesn't really need much cleaning) and I only monitoring ONE temp, not mash and HLT spargewater. I can also heat the mash directly to step up temps without scorching a thick mash. Oh, and all of my ALL-GRAIN brewing equipment fits inside the boil keggle. The bag, immersion chiller, water filter, everything except my massive mash paddle.
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GooberMcNutly
 
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Location: Central Florida

Tue May 01, 2007 4:09 am

Good on you Goober!

It looks like you are the USA BIAB Pioneer!

ThirstyBoy has banned me from answering BIAB questions here as I'm too busy answering them in Aust!

BIAB is a great way to brew and certainly not an inferior way.

I'm not too clear on how this forum works but hopefully Goober, once you have a few brews under your belt, you and Thirsty can get together and write BIAB up under a new thread that will attract a wider audience.

All the best,
Pat
I'm not as think as you drunk I am.
PistolPatch
 
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