Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:50 am

If nothing else, this is worth a try on my end. I might try my next batch this way if I can get down to the local haberdashery (whatever the F that is!) and pick up some mesh. Here in the colonies we call it mosquito netting. Even better is the super fine no-see-um netting, it's like pantyhose.

About the only fly in the ointment that I can see is that the boil kettle top has to have straight sides. Many of the keggles here have a 1-3 inch lip around the edge to hold the lid. That will have to be ground off. People with stainless pots can go right ahead.

60-70% efficiency is where I am at right now. Can't hurt.

One question: Do you hook the wok stand out of the bottom before you start boiling or do you leave it in there?
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GooberMcNutly
 
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Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:58 am

Goober... try a paint strainer bag from the local home improvement store... they have lots of big ones and one might just fit.... that's what she said.
BUB
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Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:42 am

GooberMcNutly wrote:
. . .Here in the colonies we call it mosquito netting . . .


No you dont.... maybe the super fine stuff you were talking about would do the job, but deinately NOT normal mosquito netting. Not fine enough. You aren't making just a bag to hold the grain in, you are makng a filter bag. Its got to be able to substitute reasonably effectively for the complex filter path that would be set up by your grain bed in a normal fly/batch sparge.

You are right about the rim around the kettles - it makes it harder to get the bag out. You can still do it OK as long as you dont have sharp edges to tear the bag. But the less "Rim" the better (yes Bub I know.... ) Stock pots work the best. The curtain material I am refering to also helps, it is tough and not very stretchy, so it pulls the grain into a relatively tight mass when you pull it out. Then with a bit of jiggling....

I generally leave the stand in there, but thats because my hop bag is a big one. I do smaller batches and I use a smaller kettle when I BIAB, so I leave the rack in there to keep the bag from touching the bottom and melting. Otherwise I'd probably hook it out. Dont see why i twould really matter either way though.

Bub Wrote:
Goober... try a paint strainer bag from the local home improvement store...


People use the paint strainers as hop bags right?? If they are fine enough to contain Hop pellets without letting any hop dust etc through. Then they are fine enough. But how big a size do they come in?? It would have to be a hell of a lot of paint! You shouldn't have the bag hanging in the kettle. It has to line the kettle. The rule of thumb should be that, you should be able to just fit your kettle inside the bag and do up the drawstring. If the kettle wont go in, or at least very nearly go in, the bags not big enough.

A Haberdashery is kind of like a hardware store for people who sew things.... I struggled for a better word without resorting to something like "material shop" and that just wouldn't do now would it? :roll: :D

Thirsty
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Tue Mar 27, 2007 12:05 pm

Thirsty Boy wrote:GooberMcNutly wrote:
. . .Here in the colonies we call it mosquito netting . . .


No you dont.... maybe the super fine stuff you were talking about would do the job, but deinately NOT normal mosquito netting.

A Haberdashery is kind of like a hardware store for people who sew things.... I struggled for a better word without resorting to something like "material shop" and that just wouldn't do now would it? :roll: :D

Thirsty


Thanks. Ill look for something finer than mosquito netting. Would plain 200-300 count cotton (like a big pillow case) work OK? Or is that too fine?

I thought that a haberdashery is where hats are made. Around here I guess they just call it a "sewing store" or something equally boring.

I am going to do this, maybe with my next batch (if the package from Austin Homebrew gets here before the weekend) and let everyone know. Hell, I might even take pics.
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Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:04 pm

don't you people have wives.... it's a "fabric store"
Douchebags
BUB
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Tue Mar 27, 2007 8:52 pm

GooberMcNutly wrote:
Thirsty Boy wrote:GooberMcNutly wrote:
. . .Here in the colonies we call it mosquito netting . . .


No you dont.... maybe the super fine stuff you were talking about would do the job, but deinately NOT normal mosquito netting.

A Haberdashery is kind of like a hardware store for people who sew things.... I struggled for a better word without resorting to something like "material shop" and that just wouldn't do now would it? :roll: :D

Thirsty


Thanks. Ill look for something finer than mosquito netting. Would plain 200-300 count cotton (like a big pillow case) work OK? Or is that too fine?

I thought that a haberdashery is where hats are made. Around here I guess they just call it a "sewing store" or something equally boring.

I am going to do this, maybe with my next batch (if the package from Austin Homebrew gets here before the weekend) and let everyone know. Hell, I might even take pics.


I suspect that dense/fine cotton would work OK. I doubt if you could go "too fine" If I could find finer weave cloth than the one I have, I would use it. The problem with the cotton is going to be how it stands up to repeatedly being made wet and hot, then being put under strain. If it goes at the seams... you are screwed. The reason for recommending the Polyester Voile material is that it is fine enough, rated well above 100C, strong and cheap.

Its great to hear that someone is going to give this a go. You will be really surprised at how easy a brewday can be. Remember to get a (much) finer crush on your grain than usual though, or you will need to shave a couple of points off your expected efficiency.

Have Fun!!

PS - you make hats in a Millinery

PPS- Boob. I have a wife. I sew her buttons for her. I own a sewing machine and know how to use it (badly) I also cook, vacuum, occasionally wash the dishes, enjoy shopping for clothes, know next to nothing about cars and dont really like football (no matter what version)

If it were just a fabric store, then I might not be able to buy the cord for the drawstring there... but if it were a Haberdashery I probably would. :P

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haberdashery
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Thirsty Boy
 
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Wed Mar 28, 2007 4:39 am

Boob, really, you need to get laid.
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Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:37 am

GooberMcNutly wrote:Boob, really, you need to get laid.


Call JP.
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