Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:09 am

boise_brewer wrote:Here's another question, Does the ph of the mash affect efficiency significantley. I have never measured mine and wonder if that may be a part of the problem. Thanks


Yes the PH can affect the efficiency. But in order to affect efficiency it has to be such that the enzymes (Amylase in particular) are not working properly. If you are getting conversion and the wort is sweet and ferments well, your PH is just fine. Only if you are having problems getting the mash converted or having poor attenuation, despite a correct mash temp, you should be worried about your PH.

Kai
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Kaiser
 
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Tue Sep 26, 2006 12:15 pm

boise_brewer wrote:When fly sparging, I was getting efficiency in the low 60's. Once I hit 70%, but that was kind of strange.


So you went from low 60's to 56%. Sounds to me like you're just fine. When I was fly sparging I would get 70-75 normally, sometimes 80%. Now that I batch sparge I get 60-65% depending on the recipe, so I just add more grain.

Just change your efficiency in Promash to between 55 & 60 and increase your base malt (not your specialty malts) to get your expected OG back to where you want it. After a few sessions you will dial-in the actual efficency you should expect. Remember, the premise of batch sparging is to sacrifice efficiency for time and no tanins. When you sacrifice efficiency you need to compensate by adding grain or extract.

As for your pH, it's nice to know, but I'd worry about one thing at a time.

Rob
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Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:59 pm

Speyedr wrote:and increase your base malt (not your specialty malts) to get your expected OG back to where you want it.


Does the efficiency effect base malts and specialty grains differently? I always treated them the same. Especially since I started formulating my recipies in % rather than in absolute weights.

Kai
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Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm

Kaiser wrote:
Speyedr wrote:and increase your base malt (not your specialty malts) to get your expected OG back to where you want it.


Does the efficiency effect base malts and specialty grains differently? I always treated them the same. Especially since I started formulating my recipies in % rather than in absolute weights.

Kai


Increasing the weight of base malt for a given volume of wort will primarily affect the gravity (though it will affect color and flavor to a minor degree). If you increase the weight of specialty malt in that same volume of wort, you will significantly change the character of the wort. This is especially true when using darker malts like chocolate, roasted barley, etc. Increasing these malts can throw the brew way out of style and drastically change the taste.

Wayne
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Wed Sep 27, 2006 3:46 am

BugeaterBrewing wrote:If you increase the weight of specialty malt in that same volume of wort, you will significantly change the character of the wort.


But isn't there also efficiency for the specialty grains? I can imagine the better they are crushed, the more extract you get from them and the more the affect on the beer will be.

Kai
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Kaiser
 
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Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:08 pm

My point was that if you are changing your efficiency by only a few points, you will only need a small amount of grain to boost the gravity back up to the desired levels. It is easier to just add more base malt and you will not change the resulting wort much, like Bug said. This would be equivalent to adding a little extract to boost your pre-bopil gravity in the event that it was lower than expected.

I also should have mentioned that if you have a significant amount of a particular specialty grain, 10% to 20% or more, then you may want to increase that as well, but for your 4% Munich or 2% roasted additions, it's easier to leave them be while you are trying to solve this batch sparge problem, and then tweak the recipe later once your process is good. Change one thing at a time and don't pull a Justin.

When you are perfecting a recipe, or changing the volume of a recipe you definitely need to pay more attention to the specialty grains, but that's not the problem Boise is having.

Rob
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Re: Another Efficiency Question

Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:07 am

boise_brewer wrote:I was wondering how many people double grind their grain. I hear denny conn mention that he does this. I just tried my first batch sparged beer and only got 56% efficiency, I wanted to cry. My fly sparging efficiencies are not a whole lot better though. I have my grain crushed at my local homebrew shop, and I wonder if thier mill is not crushing fine enough for me. Just wondered how many people out their are having this problem.


Actually, I don't double crush. Too much work! I just do one very fine crush. I get quite a bit of flour, but I've never had a stuck runoff. My efficiency is in the 85% range. The only way to find the right crush for YOU is to experiment. Keep crushing finer unitl you get to where you want to be.
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Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:34 pm

Thanks for all the help guys, I am brewing next friday, and I will post my new (hopefully higher), efficiencies.
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