Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:28 pm

I've been using this method of cooling down wort to produce cold break in the hopes of creating clearer beer. However, what has happened the last 2 times is I've pitched room temp. yeast into 50 degree wort, and it kills the yeast. So, if I was making an ale, and I wanted to cool the wort enough to produce the cold break, I would chill it to 55? So then I'd have to wait a few hours for it to heat up to 65 Degrees, so that I wouldn't kill my yeast which is at 75 degrees? Surely I don't have to refrigerate an ale starter before I pitch--that'd be totally wrong. do I just let 55 Degree wort sit around for 3-4 hours so it warms up to room temperature, then pitch? How long would it take for 10 gallons of 55 Degree wort to warm up to 70 degrees in my 85 degree garage?
ragin_cajun
 
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Fri Sep 29, 2006 4:12 pm

don't get cold break and cold crashing confused
Cold break happens at ~75-80 (my guess, probably even higher)
cool to pitching temp 68-75 for an ale or cooler for a lager
....
you cold crash.... (bring it down to 35 or so) when it is done fermenting and you want to shit all that yeast out.
BUB
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bub
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Fri Sep 29, 2006 7:48 pm

ragin_cajun wrote: So, if I was making an ale, and I wanted to cool the wort enough to produce the cold break, I would chill it to 55?


As Bub said, no need to chill it down that far for an Ale. Even if you want to pich an Ale cold (meaning colder than fermentation temp) you should only chill it down to 60-65 *F. It would be great if the yeast is at the same temp when pitched.

But you can also pitch an Ale at fermemtation temp or slightly above. This won't have an affect on the cold break, just the ester profile that you are getting from the yeast.

Kai
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Kaiser
 
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Wed Oct 04, 2006 9:03 am

i asked the same question @ nb and denny chimed in about cold brake good for yeast is that true?
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tireman
 
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Wed Oct 04, 2006 9:19 am

Cold break is good for the yeast, in that it has some nutrtion that the yeast can use. HOWEVER it dosen't take much at all to achieve this goal, what you would get out of a normal batch after whirlpool would be fine. Use your best effort to get the worst of the cold break off and whatever is left is fine, don't get stupid and filter the wort first or anything and you will be ok
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