Wed Sep 06, 2006 10:52 am

Kaiser wrote:This is no drawback at all. Just filter the remaing trub/wort slurry through a paper towel and store it in the freezer. I put mine in 1qt zip-top bags. This way I have Speise for priming and wort for the next yeast starters.

Kai

So the paper towels aren't a risk for infection? I might have to try this just to see. I'll use it for a small 2 gallon brew just to be safe. Sounds like fun. :)
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beer_bear
 
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Wed Sep 06, 2006 12:32 pm

I used to use a counterflow chiller. Using this, all the break went into the fermenter. After moving back to an immersion chiller, I realized that I could actually have continued with the counterflow, but run the wort at full open and place itr back into the boil pot and create a whirlpool. Then I could just run the counterflow and the pump until I hit my target temperature in the boil pot. It would still be difficult to hit lager temperatures without flowing through an ice bath. The whole idea is to leave ALL of the break in the boilpot. If there is no break in the fermenter, then the reasons to go to a secondary are limited to style characteristics, such as aging of big beers and meads, or additions to the secondary such as spices, oak chips, etc. I find that most aging characteristics can be achieved in a corny keg, such as getting rid of a protein or yeast haze. The corny can then be stored at lager temperatures - 31 to 34 degrees. Once aged, the temperature can be raised to serving temperatures, in a separate fridge. This method has made me rethink my next priority in the way of equipment. Instead of getting a conical, I need the biggest chest freezer I can find. I currently have 4 fridges dedicated to beer. One big chest freezer would offset 2 of them. Man, if I could have some of my decisions back! :drink
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Mr. Big
 
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Wed Sep 06, 2006 2:28 pm

beer_bear wrote:

So the paper towels aren't a risk for infection? I might have to try this just to see. I'll use it for a small 2 gallon brew just to be safe. Sounds like fun. :)[/quote]

I don't keep it sanitary from that point on. It would be way to much stess for me ;). Most of the time I even let it thrickle through overnight. Cold break really cloogs up everything. But at the end there is no trub in the wort that I collected. Since I boil the wort before using it, I don't have to worry about sanitation either.

Kai
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Kaiser
 
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Thu Sep 07, 2006 10:40 pm

Or dilute it to proper strength for starters and can it in the pressure cooker. Either way, sounds like an easy way to make the most of the wort.
I hope my post helped in some way. If not, please feel free to contact me.

Jamil Zainasheff
http://www.mrmalty.com

"The yeast is strong within you." K. Zainasheff
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jamilz
 
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Thu Sep 07, 2006 10:45 pm

Thirsty Boy wrote:Jamil,

What sort of Turkey baster are you using? I know it sounds a bit silly, but I have one that I use to pull samples out of carboys and it couldn't suck more than 50ml or so... are we talking a big plastic pipette with a rubber bulb on the end, or something else?

Syphoning drives me bonkers, it always takes me 4 or 5 tries to make it go properly.


I'm on the road right now, so I don't have it in front of me. I just use the cheap kind you find at the grocery store. It doesn't need to pull a lot of liquid, just enough in one pull to get the liquid flowing through the tubing. Generally, that is just enough to come up to the top of the carboy and over the lip. It helps if you start with the tubing outside the carboy lower than the end of the tubing inside the carboy. Once it fills up, I raise the end of the tubing (the end outside the carboy) to stop the beer from running all over the ground. Then I run out a sample for the hydrometer, etc. Then I run the rest into a keg.

And let me stress, if you already have success with some other method, then there is no reason I can think of to try to emulate my way of doing it.
I hope my post helped in some way. If not, please feel free to contact me.

Jamil Zainasheff
http://www.mrmalty.com

"The yeast is strong within you." K. Zainasheff
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jamilz
 
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Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:39 am

Thirsty Boy wrote:What sort of Turkey baster are you using? I know it sounds a bit silly, but I have one that I use to pull samples out of carboys and it couldn't suck more than 50ml or so... are we talking a big plastic pipette with a rubber bulb on the end, or something else


Thirsty,

There are different sizes of turkey basters available here, but you have the description right. I don't know what they're called in OZ, maybe just basters, or Emu Basters? Roo Basters? :)


JamilZ wrote: I just use the cheap kind you find at the grocery store. It doesn't need to pull a lot of liquid, just enough in one pull to get the liquid flowing through the tubing. Generally, that is just enough to come up to the top of the carboy and over the lip. It helps if you start with the tubing outside the carboy lower than the end of the tubing inside the carboy. Once it fills up, I raise the end of the tubing (the end outside the carboy) to stop the beer from running all over the ground. Then I run out a sample for the hydrometer, etc. Then I run the rest into a keg.


Truly genious. BRILLIANT!

JamilZ wrote:And let me stress, if you already have success with some other method, then there is no reason I can think of to try to emulate my way of doing it.


Unless of course your racking canes keep cracking at the top due to the pressure from the hose clamp so you can keep out that pesky O2 and you don't want to spend another $15 on an autosiphon... I'm going to the Acme for a Turkey Baster!!!

Rob
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Speyedr
 
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Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:49 am

I use a tube full of StarSan.

jamilz wrote:
I'm on the road right now, so I don't have it in front of me. I just use the cheap kind you find at the grocery store. It doesn't need to pull a lot of liquid, just enough in one pull to get the liquid flowing through the tubing. Generally, that is just enough to come up to the top of the carboy and over the lip. It helps if you start with the tubing outside the carboy lower than the end of the tubing inside the carboy. Once it fills up, I raise the end of the tubing (the end outside the carboy) to stop the beer from running all over the ground. Then I run out a sample for the hydrometer, etc. Then I run the rest into a keg.

And let me stress, if you already have success with some other method, then there is no reason I can think of to try to emulate my way of doing it.


I have tried this and could never get the baster to pull the liquid up and over the lip carboy – stupid baster.

Tom
Carboy1: Blonde
Carboy2: Pale Ale
Carboy3: Pale Ale
Bottled: Amber Lager, Porter
Kegged: Star San, empty, empty, empty, empty, empty
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TWC3
 
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Fri Sep 08, 2006 3:02 pm

I'm gonna buy stock in Turkey Basters.
ENJOY YER BEER and let them that don't want none have memories of not havin' any!
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diver
 
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