Tue Sep 12, 2006 7:13 am

medtech wrote:hmm, I've never used a brite tank before, usually I just pour off the first pint from a fresh keg and all the junk is gone.

Couldn't I just use my conical as brite tank too? After primary fermenting is done I could crank the temp down to about 35, wait another week, then transfer to kegs without moving the conical. This would seem to work fine to me, any opinions?


That sounds perfect to me. If I had a conical, that is how I would do it.

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Wed Sep 13, 2006 4:45 pm

Yeah met Tech that is kinda the Idea for a conical.... big breweries use seperate tanks because it frees up the fermenter for another batch.
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Thu Oct 05, 2006 6:02 pm

So I finally got around to brewing again today after my 1.5 month time out. I did it in true fashion with brewing 4 beers today, trying my new methods I have been waiting to try. One of which was Jamil Z's whirlpooling/chilling ( http://www.mrmalty.com/chiller.php ). Everything went great, however on all 4 beers, at the end of the chilling cycle they all foamed tons. I am not worried or anything about it but was curious if other people had this happen.. It seemed like it started to foam once the temperature got below 70f. I snapped some pictures ..... http://www.rabeb25.mikesdecks.com/BEER/New%20Chilling/

Anyone?sorry.gif!!??!?!


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Fri Oct 06, 2006 4:47 am

rabeb25 wrote: Everything went great, however on all 4 beers, at the end of the chilling cycle they all foamed tons.


Maybe your pump drew some air.

Kai
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Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:30 am

Kaiser wrote:
rabeb25 wrote: Everything went great, however on all 4 beers, at the end of the chilling cycle they all foamed tons.


Maybe your pump drew some air.

Kai


Hey, that brings up an idea to introduce O2 at the end of the whirlpool/chill cycle. This way it gets mixed in rather than just immediately coming out o solution.

A simple brass tee could be installed for the injection stone. Chill, aerate, and whirlpool in one step!
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Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:32 am

I have seen several setups like this on the web. Do a google.
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Sun Oct 08, 2006 4:05 am

I dont use the whirlpool chiller, but re-circulate my wort through my HLT/HERMS coil, with cold water flowing through the tank. Sort of a counter flow I suppose.

Once the wort is below the Hotside aeration temp (I'm not really a beliver but why tempt fate) I pull the hose up from below the level of the wort and just let it "splash" in there from the top of the kettle the whole time till I am down to pitching temp. Then I let the trub and stuff settle out.

I figure by the time I have finished cooling, I have pretty much aerated as well.

Or am I kidding myself?
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