2 day brew process

Tue Aug 15, 2006 2:55 pm

Providing all sanitation measures are taken and things are properly sealed. Can you mash one day and brew the next. I am short on time as of late and want to mash and sparge on day 1. Store the collected wort in a closed container over night and then transfer the wort to a brew kettle and boil, hop and pitch as normal. I've been told not to do this but was never given a good reason as to why. So WHY
Dahoove
 
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:30 pm

This topic is a real can of worms. Many folks will tell you not to do this under any circumstances and others will tell you that they have done this hundreds of times with no ill effects.

That said, the reason behind not doing this is that the grain will have lots of lacto organisms. The longer you let the wort sit, the more chance there is for these critters to grow, resulting in a sour beer. Boiling the wort the next day will halt the souring process at whatever stage it had already reached.

If you mash and sparge late in the evening and boil first thing in the morning, chances are that you will not get any noticeable souring. Waiting until the following evening may result in significant souring. If you can cool the wort after the sparge and then refrigerate you may buy an extra half day or so.

I would not do a 2 day sparge myself. My recommendation would be to take a look at your brewday process to see if you can significantly shorten your day. When I know I am going to be short on time on brewday, I mill my grains and weigh out all my hop additions the night before as well as organize all the equipment I will need. I use a heatstick to heat my water for the mash, so I plug that into an appliance timer so by the time I get up in the morning, my water is ready ( I will add cold water if it has gone too high). I can then mash in right when I get up and then brush my teeth, shower, eat breakfast, etc. while the mash is going on.

I then batch sparge. This saves an hour or so over doing a fly sparge. During the boil, I clean the mash tun and any other mess I made. By the time I have finished chilling, the only cleanup I have to do is my brewpot, autosiphon, and hydrometer. If I start my mash at 7:00 a.m., I can have my beer in the fermenter by 11:00. If I couldn't find four hours to brew, I wouldn't brew.

Just my two cents worth. Hope it answers your question and possibly helps your problem.

Wayne
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Bugeater
 
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:30 pm

you may get a sour beer due to infection... you CAN do it, but it may turn out shitty.
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bub
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:31 pm

You can

BUT...

24 hrs is enough time to develop an infection, some off-flavors or sourness. Eventhough the boil the second day will sanitize the beer it will not fix the flavor. If you plan on doing this my recommendation is to make a beer that a slight sour tang works with like a wit or a wheat. Or make something big that can hide the off flavors.


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wezil
 
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:53 pm

You can try boiling it for about 10 min after sparging. Then put a sanitized lid on and let it sit overnight.

But I agree with Bugeater that you might be better off trying to optimize your brewday. I can do a single infusion mash batch in ~4hrs including cleaning-up.

Kai
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Kaiser
 
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 6:22 pm

Ok good enough for me I'll make time. But Wow a 4 hour brew day? I can't get it under 6 and I'm not really wasting any time with the exception of fly sparging. I do 10 gallons and use a propane burner so my real time loss is heating the mash water and getting the wort to a boil. During the collection I turn the flame on after I get a 1/4 of my total collection which helps a little. I think it is time to invest in a 2nd converted keg and use it as a hot liquor tank and start batch sparging.

Thanks all
Dahoove
 
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 6:39 pm

Shit, my brew partner and I had an 11 hr. brewday last week, we made 10 gal. of Imperial Stout and we only have a 5 gal mash tun. We ended up doing 2 full mashes and 2 full sparges (fly sparges).
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one_eye
 
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Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:08 pm

Dahoove wrote:Ok good enough for me I'll make time. But Wow a 4 hour brew day? I can't get it under 6 and I'm not really wasting any time with the exception of fly sparging. I do 10 gallons and use a propane burner so my real time loss is heating the mash water and getting the wort to a boil. During the collection I turn the flame on after I get a 1/4 of my total collection which helps a little. I think it is time to invest in a 2nd converted keg and use it as a hot liquor tank and start batch sparging.


30 min heating the mash water
60 min mash and heating the sparge water (which goes in a cooler to keep it hot)
30 min batch sparging (bringing the run-off to a boil between sparges)
70 min boil
20 min chilling
20 min whirlpool rest
10 min transfering to carboy

4:00 total

ok, clean-up of the kettle may have to wait for the next day. I also find the brew-days more enjoyable when I can spend more time mashing, boiling and drinking ;)
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Kaiser
 
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