Thu Jun 15, 2006 3:15 am

Kaiser wrote:
Steve wrote: I've heard other's calling for the use of beano but never really understood exactly for what. Could you add just a bit and elaborate on it's enzymatic contribution? I appreciate your help on this.


Beano is an enzyme preparation that contains amylases to break down starches and dextrines. You can also get amylase enzymes from your home brew store, but beano might be cheaper.

Some brewers even use it in the fermenter to fix a high FG. I'm not a big fan of this at all, since there is no way to stop the enzymes from working. All dextrines will be converted to fermentable sugar and you will end up with a very thin beer that has little taste, but lots of alcohol. Making a lighter batch and blending the 2 souds like a better solution.

Using enzymes in the brewkettle is different. You can stop them by bringing the wort to a boil once the desired conversion has been achieved.

But I have to say, that I haven't used any additional enzymes yet and are only repeating what I have read about their use and their potential problems.

Kai


Ahhh, I gotcha. I was only hoping for a bit more understanding of how beano could help on a situation like that and I believe you've clarified that for me. Thanks. As you probably surmized this is an actual problem I'm working through. I have converted kegs for brew vessals and when you have a "thirty pound" mash it's like driving a tractor trailer. That big thing won't slow down for anything. The thermal mass drives the temp. up with only a little burst of heat. I believe I had only a thirty minute mash before it went too far. I attempted to add ice and stir it in but that didn't help. Knowing what had taken place I added enough LME to the brewpot to make it work out. This should be an interesting brew no matter what goes on. So far primary fermentation is still bubbling away and I see a major layer of trub forming on the bottem half of the two fermentors. Once I start taking my follow up grav readings I'll have a clearer picture of where this brew is headed. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks for your help!

Steve
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Sat Jun 24, 2006 2:51 am

Steve wrote:
Kaiser wrote:
Steve wrote: I've heard other's calling for the use of beano but never really understood exactly for what. Could you add just a bit and elaborate on it's enzymatic contribution? I appreciate your help on this.


Beano is an enzyme preparation that contains amylases to break down starches and dextrines. You can also get amylase enzymes from your home brew store, but beano might be cheaper.

Some brewers even use it in the fermenter to fix a high FG. I'm not a big fan of this at all, since there is no way to stop the enzymes from working. All dextrines will be converted to fermentable sugar and you will end up with a very thin beer that has little taste, but lots of alcohol. Making a lighter batch and blending the 2 souds like a better solution.

Using enzymes in the brewkettle is different. You can stop them by bringing the wort to a boil once the desired conversion has been achieved.

But I have to say, that I haven't used any additional enzymes yet and are only repeating what I have read about their use and their potential problems.

Kai


Ahhh, I gotcha. I was only hoping for a bit more understanding of how beano could help on a situation like that and I believe you've clarified that for me. Thanks. As you probably surmized this is an actual problem I'm working through. I have converted kegs for brew vessals and when you have a "thirty pound" mash it's like driving a tractor trailer. That big thing won't slow down for anything. The thermal mass drives the temp. up with only a little burst of heat. I believe I had only a thirty minute mash before it went too far. I attempted to add ice and stir it in but that didn't help. Knowing what had taken place I added enough LME to the brewpot to make it work out. This should be an interesting brew no matter what goes on. So far primary fermentation is still bubbling away and I see a major layer of trub forming on the bottem half of the two fermentors. Once I start taking my follow up grav readings I'll have a clearer picture of where this brew is headed. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks for your help!

Steve


As a follow up to this seemingly "lost" effort, I've proceeded to the secondary and believe it or not this beer is turning out great! The one thing I did notice that I haven't on previous beers is the amount of yeast and trub sediment that formed in each of the glass carboys. Can you believe it, a full gallon and a half in each of the two! I've never seen that much settle out. But the samples taste great, no sign of off flavors. I wasn't expecting it to turn out as well with all the previous trouble. Well, I'm happy!
Steve
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Sun Jul 09, 2006 3:16 am

As a follow up to this seemingly "lost" effort, I've proceeded to the secondary and believe it or not this beer is turning out great! The one thing I did notice that I haven't on previous beers is the amount of yeast and trub sediment that formed in each of the glass carboys. Can you believe it, a full gallon and a half in each of the two! I've never seen that much settle out. But the samples taste great, no sign of off flavors. I wasn't expecting it to turn out as well with all the previous trouble. Well, I'm happy!

Steve[/quote]


For a second followup on this backyard disaster, I gotta say I think this is a winner! It seemed as if it would have all kinds of problems initialy but at the different stages it proved otherwise. I guess my resistance to toss this one out was well justified. It just went into the bottle yesterday and the samples tasted great. It had a nice hop signiture not overly bitter and quite aromatic. It was quite malty with a distinct creamy flavor. It came to an ABV of 4.5.

Steve
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Mon Jul 10, 2006 6:53 pm

glad to hear that it turned out great for you. What was the attenuation (or OG and FG) on this batch?

Kai
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Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:12 am

Kaiser wrote:glad to hear that it turned out great for you. What was the attenuation (or OG and FG) on this batch?

Kai



My starting grav. was 1.072 the finishing grav. came down to 1.030. Each of the two fermenters had around three to four inches of sediment which I saved most of. It used two vials of wlp001 which I built up in a starter prior to brewday. It won't be long now, I'm jonsin to give this one a test drive.
Steve
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