Wed May 24, 2006 8:59 am

Dou you guys recommend heating the wort as soon as it comes out of the lauter? I have been doing this since I don't want any enzymatic activity after the mash is done and just a mash out is not deactivating all the enzymes.

What is your take on that? This would not be possible if you collect the runnings into a non-heated and poorly insulated vessel.

Kai
User avatar
Kaiser
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Pepperell, MA

Wed May 24, 2006 10:04 am

Mashout is not really necessary IMHO. It primarily came into common usage to speed up the runoff by decreasing viscosity. Enzymes will be terminated when the kettle heats up anyway, so it's really a moot point imho. Ttyal, and ilbcnu!

Prost!

Michel
User avatar
zymurgest
 
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 10:27 am

Wed May 24, 2006 10:18 am

zymurgest wrote:Mashout is not really necessary IMHO. It primarily came into common usage to speed up the runoff by decreasing viscosity. Enzymes will be terminated when the kettle heats up anyway


What about being able to fix the attenuation of the wort by preventing it temperature to drop back into the range of amylase activity?

I feel that if I do a mash-out, sparge at that temp and immediately heat in the kettle, my attenuation is only determined by the conditions during the saccrification rest.

Kai
User avatar
Kaiser
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Pepperell, MA

Wed May 24, 2006 10:43 am

Kai asks: What about being able to fix the attenuation of the wort by preventing it temperature to drop back into the range of amylase activity?

By then, your still making a moot point, as the enzymatic activity is trivial at that point in time imho. Better to fix the attenuation by having the temperature rests where you planned, and then use an appropriate yeast to do the job. I like to make highly fermentable worts, and then use medium attenuating yeasts, which tends to give me the right body and alcohol level I prefer in my beers.

I feel that if I do a mash-out, sparge at that temp and immediately heat in the kettle, my attenuation is only determined by the conditions during the saccrification rest.

While thats true, you shouldn't lose that much heat during sparging, and if you are, then you have more serious problems than simply dropping back into the sacc rest temp imho. By all means do a mashout, if that gives you peace of mind, but I've found that using 170'F/77'C sparge water at the surface of the wort suffices to raise the mash to at least 165'F/74'C within 15-20 minutes and my final exit temp is usually around 168'F/76'C.

Prost!

Michel
User avatar
zymurgest
 
Posts: 271
Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2006 10:27 am

Wed May 24, 2006 3:40 pm

We've got the cheep cooler system going now, but I'm still looking to up grade in the future.

Kaiser - I'm not even sure I know what you and zymurgest are talking about, why do you care about enzymes after the mash is over and the wort is in the kettle.
User avatar
one_eye
 
Posts: 105
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:10 pm
Location: Denver, CO

Wed May 24, 2006 4:05 pm

one_eye wrote:Kaiser - I'm not even sure I know what you and zymurgest are talking about, why do you care about enzymes after the mash is over and the wort is in the kettle.


Because they are still there and may get active again if the temperature of the wort drops. But I don't know for sure and it is easy enough for me to boil the runnings between batch spargings.

Kai
User avatar
Kaiser
 
Posts: 434
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Pepperell, MA

Wed May 24, 2006 4:24 pm

Kaiser wrote:Because they are still there and may get active again if the temperature of the wort drops. But I don't know for sure and it is easy enough for me to boil the runnings between batch spargings.

Kai

Honestly, I haven't been reading this thread, but this post caught my eye. Enzymes do not reactivate. Once they are denatured, that's it. It is exactly the same process that turns an egg from clear and runny to white and hard. Cooling down a cooked egg doesn't make it slimy again. Neither will cooling the wort reactivate enzymes. Anyway, it wouldn't really matter if they did reactivate. Once conversion is complete, it's complete; extra time or even extra enzymes won't change the wort makeup significantly.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors -- and miss.
--Robert A. Heinlein: The Notebooks of Lazarus Long
Brewing Water Page - Enter and view water data.
User avatar
George
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2005 12:21 pm
Location: Indianapolis, IN

Wed May 24, 2006 6:14 pm

What are you trying to say George?
[/quote]
caught my eye.
[/quote]

Anyway.. I get it now... And I'm with George, the protiens will bd denatured, and even if there were some scraggler the worst that would happen is the loss of a little mouth feel, the sugar is already there and there realy shouldn't be much starch, so maybe some of the longer chain dextrins would get chomped down some more, but I wouldn't worry about it.

But then again I only have one eye and just started doing all grain.
User avatar
one_eye
 
Posts: 105
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:10 pm
Location: Denver, CO

PreviousNext

Return to All Grain Brewing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users

A BIT ABOUT US

The Brewing Network is a multimedia resource for brewers and beer lovers. Since 2005, we have been the leader in craft beer entertainment and information with live beer radio, podcasts, video, events and more.