Re: Newbie here

Sat Feb 27, 2016 5:56 am

Beyond berliner weisse (which I do like quite a lot), I have no experience with sours. If I can make a suggestion for your first run at it, try making something using the kettle souring technique. This involves souring the stuff in the kettle before you boil it (so it sits in the kettle for a day or two warm to let the lacto sour it up, then you boil it and make it like you would a normal beer. The advantage of that is that you kill all the bugs in the boil and you don't risk contaminating your stuff. Therefore, you don't need to buy a second set of equipment.

You won't get the same complexity or whatever that people like in many sour beers (I'm not a big sour beer person), but it is a good way to get your feet a little wet and make something you can enjoy. Also, the turn around time on it can be pretty quick since the kettle souring happens in days instead of months.
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NateBrews
 
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Re: Newbie here

Sun Feb 28, 2016 4:14 pm

NateBrews wrote:Beyond berliner weisse (which I do like quite a lot), I have no experience with sours. If I can make a suggestion for your first run at it, try making something using the kettle souring technique. This involves souring the stuff in the kettle before you boil it (so it sits in the kettle for a day or two warm to let the lacto sour it up, then you boil it and make it like you would a normal beer. The advantage of that is that you kill all the bugs in the boil and you don't risk contaminating your stuff. Therefore, you don't need to buy a second set of equipment.

You won't get the same complexity or whatever that people like in many sour beers (I'm not a big sour beer person), but it is a good way to get your feet a little wet and make something you can enjoy. Also, the turn around time on it can be pretty quick since the kettle souring happens in days instead of months.

Thank you! I haven't read anything about that kind of brewing and I did read a lot before I took plunge...any links or recipes that might come in handy? I wouldn't mind my first batches not being as complex for sometime since there's plenty of stuff I still need to learn but what you're recommending seems very functional to me...I been having a bottle of supplication for a while now that I haven't drank since I read you can make a starter with the yeast left behind but I'm not sure about it lol..can that apply to souring other beers also? Tia
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Re: Newbie here

Sun Feb 28, 2016 6:54 pm

I don't really have much that I can point you at specifically. I know that it has been batted around a lot on various shows. I think that there is some Brew Strong stuff that covers it, and It has certainly been mentioned on the session a few times. There are also a couple Basic Brewing radio/video things on doing kettle souring.

I would put in the brewtoad link to my berliner wiesse, but they appear to be down at the moment.
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NateBrews
 
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Re: Newbie here

Sun Mar 06, 2016 6:07 pm

Just a quick plug in response to the Pale Ale kit; I just brewed an Austin HS Mirror Pond clone and it was spot on. Only advice with that is watch the mash temp. I went a little low, like 147 and added some HLT water to make it 151, on accident. It definitely affected the body.
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